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Featured Speakers

2014 Annual Conference


Speaker Keynote Speaker (Thursday morning)

Stephen Black

Stephen Black, grandson of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo L. Black, grew up in New Mexico after most of his family left the state in the 1950's and 60's following his grandfather's role in controversial Civil Rights decisions, including Brown v. Board of Education. Despite growing up over 1,000 miles away, from a very young age, he was fascinated by Alabama and the legacy of his family's commitment to public service in their home state.

Mr. Black received his bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania where he graduated magna cum laude and his Juris Doctorate from Yale Law School in 1997. Following his graduation from law school, he returned to Alabama to join the Birmingham law firm, Maynard, Cooper & Gale, PC.

After three years with the firm, he was called to public service — serving for a brief time as an assistant to the Governor focusing on policy and economic development projects. Encouraged by the enthusiasm of thousands of students he encountered when speaking across the state, he turned his focus to founding and leading the Center for Ethics & Social Responsibility at The University of Alabama, where he has served as Director since 2004.

In 2004, Mr. Black also founded Impact Alabama: A Student Service Initiative and currently serves as its President and Chairman of the Board. Housed at the UA Center for Ethics & Social Responsibility, Impact Alabama is an award-winning nonprofit with a staff of 46 full-time college graduates who have provided more than 5,200 college students the opportunity to participate in structured service projects designed to promote learning and leadership development.


Speaker Closing Session Speaker (Friday afternoon)

Dr. Marvin Dunn

As Resident Scholar of the Institute of Homeless Studies at Camillus House, Dr. Marvin Dunn is responsible for Institute's curriculum development and cultural diversity. Dr. Dunn began his career as a naval officer, serving from 1961 to 1967. He served as an officer aboard the aircraft carriers U.S.S. Kitty Hawk and the U.S.S. Saratoga, and was the commander of the 14th Battalion, U.S. Naval Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, Illinois.

Dr. Dunn is a retired assistant professor of psychology and former chairperson of the Department of Psychology at Florida International University. In that position he was a seminal influence on students working for positive social change. He began such innovative programs as the Cultural and Human Interaction Center, which addressed racially motivated violence in the Dade County schools of the early 1970's. During that same period he shaped and guided The Institute on Sexism and Racism at Florida International University. In 1981, he founded the Academy for Community Education, an innovative program, which addressed the needs of youth at risk of becoming school dropouts. A book he co-authored, The Miami Riots of 1980, Crossing the Bounds, a study of the McDuffie riots in Dade County, is the definitive work on this historic event.

Throughout his career Dr. Dunn has worked tirelessly for positive social change and social justice. In 1989, he was named Educator of the Year by the Florida Civil Rights Commission. Dr. Dunn's writing and research interests also encompass history. His book, Black Miami in the Twentieth Century, was published in 1997. Dr. Dunn's latest book, "The Storm is Passing Over," The History of Blacks in Florida (1513-2000), will be published soon.

Dr. Dunn has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology from Morehouse College in Atlanta; a Masters Degree in Education, Administration and Supervision from the Roosevelt University in Chicago; and a PhD in Psychology from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.